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Recognition in international law a bibliography by Stefan Talmon

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Published by Martinus Nijhoff Publishers in The Hague, Boston .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Recognition (International law) -- Bibliography.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes indexes.

Statementcompiled by Stefan Talmon.
GenreBibliography.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsKZ4041 .T349 2000
The Physical Object
Paginationxxxvi, 401 p. ;
Number of Pages401
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6792870M
ISBN 109041114408
LC Control Number00058709

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Recognition involves consequences both on the international plane and within municipal law. If an entity is recognised as a state in, for example, the United Kingdom, it will entail the consideration of rights and duties that would not otherwise be relevant. Originally published by Hersch Lauterpacht in , this book presents a detailed study of recognition in international law, examining its crucial significance in relation to /5. Wheaton's Elements of international law. Elements of International Law, first published in , is a book on international law by Henry Wheaton which has long been influential. This book was translated into many languages and became a standard work. On his own merits Wheaton is clearly entitled to rank among the classics. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Lauterpacht, Hersch, Recognition in international law. New York: AMS Press, (OCoLC)

The Law of Recognition (The Laws of Life Series) Paperback – January 5, You've read the top international reviews. See all reviews from the United States. What digital items do customers buy after viewing this item? Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of /5(). Some definitions of “international law” can be found on the Web as follows: “The body of laws governing relations between nations”, “International law is the term commonly used for referring to the system of implicit and explicit agreements that bind together nation-states in adherence to recognized values and standards, differing from other legal systems in that it concerns nations. Originally published by Hersch Lauterpacht in , this book presents a detailed study of recognition in international law, examining its crucial significance in relation to statehood, governments and belligerency. The author develops a strong argument for positioning recognition within the context of international law, reacting against the 5/5(1). Recognition, the topic of this book, captured my attention as a third-year JD candidate at the Yale Law School. It was autumn , and I was taking W. Michael Reisman's course on public international law.

THE YALE LAW JOURNAL VOLUME 53 JUNE, NUMBER 3 I!I I II.I I I I I I RECOGNITION OF STATES IN INTERNATIONAL LAW By H. LAUTERPACHT t I. INTRODUCTORY Principles of the Recognition of States. To recognize a community as a State is to declare that it fulfills the conditions of statehood as required by international law.   The bibliography lists the literature and State practice on the question of recognition in international law for the last two hundred years. It contains books and articles, ie. contributions to journals and other collected works such as Festschriften and Encyclopaedias, as well as (published and unpublished) theses, pamphlets, compilations of diplomatic documents and case notes. The bibliography lists the literature and State practice on the question of recognition in international law for the last two hundred years. It contains books and articles, ie. contributions to journals and other collected works such as Festschriften and Encyclopaedias, as well as (published and unpublished) theses, pamphlets, compilations of diplomatic documents and case notes. This book studies the recognition of governments in international law. It is based on an analysis of the diplomatic practice of states as well as decisions by national and international courts. It explores the two central questions of the recognition of governments: what are the meanings of the term ‘recognition’ and its variants in international law such as de facto, de jure, and Author: Stefan Talmon.